THE TINY WHITE ROOM

I SHOULD STOP BEING A SHUT IN ALREADY OMG

162,331 notes

buckbarrow:

do you ever have second-hand obsessions

like one of your friends is super obsessed with a thing so whenever you see something about it you’re like “YES THIS THING” but you’re not the one obsessed with it. they are. you know very little about this thing and yet it still excites you because it excites your friend

(via linpatootie)

67,221 notes

It seems that when you want to make a woman into a hero, you hurt her first. When you want to make a man into a hero, you hurt… also a woman first.

Leigh Alexander absolutely hits it out of the park (via bedabug)

#feminism#comics #as a side note i wonder if this is why a character like the winter soldier strikes such a chord here #because no one gets hurt on his behalf and it just feels… not more authentic #but maybe a leetle less patriarchy oriented #from a storytelling standpoint (via fireflyca)

(via oh-dr-lecter)

32,755 notes

misandry-mermaid:

clandide:

Why does no one ever talk about rape victims and PTSD? Up until this Abnormal Psychology class, I’ve always been told that Combat was the major contributor to PTSD but damn, it’s 20% less than Rape. So please don’t tell rape victims to “get over it” or “its already over, it can’t change” because over 60% of rape victims have had their brain chemistry changed; PTSD is a mental disorder whether it is because of combat or because of rape.

This is SO incredibly important, you guys.

misandry-mermaid:

clandide:

Why does no one ever talk about rape victims and PTSD? Up until this Abnormal Psychology class, I’ve always been told that Combat was the major contributor to PTSD but damn, it’s 20% less than Rape. So please don’t tell rape victims to “get over it” or “its already over, it can’t change” because over 60% of rape victims have had their brain chemistry changed; PTSD is a mental disorder whether it is because of combat or because of rape.

This is SO incredibly important, you guys.

(Source: flugellovemachine, via madnizilla)

314,968 notes

fachyeahoperasingers:

paranoidmedic:

bowsandbitemarksxo:

sillygrrrl:

octopuscunt:

minorfallandthemajorlift:

Kiki Smith - Lilith, 1994 - Bronze, silicon, and glass.

“In medieval Jewish lore, Lilith was Adam’s first wife.  When she demanded to be Adam’s equal, she was evicted from the Garden of Eden.  Lilith flew away to the demon world, replaced by the more submissive Eve.  Smith catches us off guard with Lilith’s pose and placement.  Most sculptures receive our gaze passively, but Lilith stares back with piercing brown eyes, ready to pounce.”

hella dope

THANK YOU

my mother told me this story over and over when I was little

"Always be Lilith, never Eve"

"Always be Lilith, never Eve"

  1. Scary as fuck.
  2. True story about Lilith.
  3. I SENSE AN OPERA COMING

314 notes

I think their primary prejudice is, Why does it have to take seven minutes to sing “I love you,” or five minutes to sing “I’m dying now”? I always say, “But that’s extremely fast.” Not in realistic terms, of course. But if you go to opera and expect realism, you’re really stupid. It’s not realism, obviously - even if we build a realistic set. Trying to express yourself about love in five minutes is fast. It can take two years to say that or to even understand that. Saying “I’m dying” in seven minutes is fast. Thinking about death occupies people from puberty through the rest of our lives. It’s the biggest existential question there is. But to express yourself about the feeling of dying, or the anxiety of dying, in seven minutes is actually pretty fast. My point is, in one evening, you go through in two and one-half hours what the rest of us spend our whole emotional lives living through. (…) It’s a workout, intense and focused - if you look for the emotional dimension and not the realistic one. Opera tries to show life as it is, not as it looks. (…) The reason it seems long is that we spend time on what’s important in life. When you look at your life, what’s going to define what it was? Not the everyday business, but the emotional highlights, disasters, or triumphs you had. That’s what we focus on in opera. and that’s because we have music.
Kasper Bech Holten (director of the Danish Royal Opera) answering the question “Do you think your average spectators have difficulty investing themselves emotionally?” in Joshua Jampol’s book Living Opera (via operanerd)

(via fachyeahoperasingers)